Paperhouse: On Dancing

When simplified to the most basic interpretation, people dance for two reasons: For a love of movement and for a love of sex. These two motivations dominate any dance floor and are in a constant state of conflict. Unfortunately, it appears that far too many individuals simply see dancing as an opportunity to attract one another.

Imagine yourself at a dance party. Do you know what the DJ is playing? The thumping sounds emitting from the speakers aren’t playing Rihanna and Calvin Harris’ “We Found Love” or even the latest Skrillex jam. Despite this, some people are dancing the night away without a care in world. At the same time, a girl in stiletto heels who is wearing far too much makeup walks up to the DJ and asks for something people can dance to.

Why is only half of the crowd dancing? Perhaps only half of the crowd is dancing for the right reason. Those who dance out of a love of movement do not care about the artist being played, but rather they care about the experience and the atmosphere the DJ is creating. As long as the DJ can create fluid transitions and keep a sense of tension, this crowd could care less what genre of music they are listening to.

On the other hand, those who dance to attract others tend to only dance to music they have heard before. The ability to recognize the song is essential, as this dictates the “appropriate” style of dance. These types of dancers are not truly interested in experiencing the music, but care more about who is looking at them. This over-sexualized form of dancing is ruining the concept of the infinite beat. When a love of movement is removed from the equation, the idea of dancing until sunrise or dancing in the middle of the day seems absurd.

Next time you find yourself listening to music you are unfamiliar with, don’t become distraught. Instead, think about how this music can compel your body to move. If you follow these steps, I promise you’ll have a better time. You might even attract something better than a one-night stand.